Food

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Thu Jan 30, 2020 4:53 am


I mentioned it at great length here, in your other thread about food:

viewtopic.php?p=2305203#p2305203

This is why it's best to keep similar questions in one topic instead of having multiple ones.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Jan 30, 2020 8:38 am


Ditto Sef. She knows of what she speaks!

sozansound2

Post   » Thu Jan 30, 2020 10:58 am


Alright. I usually remember these things but at that time I was good back and forth everyday. Apologies.

And yes she is very picky with certain veggies sadly. She ate some cucumbers but ignored them at first so I assume she will ignore them completely next time.

sozansound2

Post   » Fri Jan 31, 2020 1:25 am


The oxbow pellets you speak of is the essential adult guinea pig (Timothy based) right?

That is the name I see pop up everywhere.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Fri Jan 31, 2020 7:16 am


Yes, that's the one.

Many of us also use KMS Hayloft:
https://kmshayloft.com/

sozansound2

Post   » Fri Jan 31, 2020 4:11 pm


Thank you, I appreciate this.

sozansound2

Post   » Thu Feb 06, 2020 2:26 am


For the past few days I noticed the female pig peeing out occasional small pools of white powder. At first I tought it was the transition off the pellets since she could still have some in her system.

She has been off the old pellets for a week or so and decided to wait till I replace her fleece bedding. I found the powder again. The only thing that is high in calcium (while I wait for the new pellets to come) is cilantro. We only give like 1-2. She drink decent amount of water. All veggies are also drenched in water to be sure she is drinking a good amount (poops look good so not giving her too much water).

I have no clue why she is still peeing white powder

bpatters
And got the T-shirt

Post   » Thu Feb 06, 2020 9:23 am


I'd omit the cilantro. In some pigs, it has the same effect as romaine -- excess urinary calcium.

And it's not necessarily the amount of calcium in a food that causes the problem. Romaine is no higher in calcium than most other lettuces, but it definitely caused excess calcium deposits with my pigs. Cilantro did the same.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Feb 06, 2020 9:47 am


Interesting. I never fed cilantro so never noticed this but certainly did notice the issue with romaine.

sozansound2

Post   » Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:19 am


So the new pellets came today.

I will see what happens bot giving cilantro.

We also give her some celery as well. Staples are red and green leaf, all colors of peppers.

Gonna give the pellets every other day so atleast she gets the other nutrients she lacks and see how she urinates.

sozansound2

Post   » Thu Feb 20, 2020 12:30 am


So the female pig is extremely picky when it comes to her veggies.

I know for a fact she will eat red and green lettuce, any color peppers, cilantro, carrots and celery. That is pretty much it. She refuses to eat anything other than that.

I been giving every other day, pellets. The one I give is the new one from kms hayloth and not using the remaining pellets I have from smart pet select.

I believe I noticed far less calcium in her urine but it is not easy since she pees in different areas in the cage so hard to pin point how much of a difference. Just from some small white patches I see here and there.

I feel like she can't tolerate the pellets that well. We don't give cilantro almost at all just so I can watch how she pees since cilantro has a good amount of calcium. It is not like I can stop giving her pellets cause being very picky, the veggie list shrinks and she will miss out on essential vitamins and minerals.

Maybe space out the days I give out pellets? Instead of every other day, maybe every second day. See how she reacts?

I give 2 scoops of 1/8 of a tbsp.

Any suggestions on this? What I wrote above is all I can think of at the moment.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Thu Feb 20, 2020 3:14 am


Why do you think she can't tolerate the pellets? KMS Hayloft has the lowest amount of calcium of any commercial pellets in the US. I'd be very surprised if they are the problem. Get rid of the cilantro entirely and see if you notice a difference in calcium deposits. If you keep reducing pellets, she will start losing weight and could very well end up with vitamin deficiencies, as you said.

sozansound2

Post   » Thu Feb 20, 2020 12:06 pm


I should of clarified about this before. Reason I give reduced pellets is because she was originally overweight. I been adjusting the pellet intake so she can safely loose weight and be in a good range. Not too close to underweight but not close to being overweight.

So far she is able to do things and her belly is reducing as well.

I also have not given cilantro in about a month just to watch and see how that affects her.

The reason why I said maybe she can't tolerate the pellets much is because the only thing that she consumes that has any type of higher calcium (not saying it is by allot) is the pellets. It was just a guess. Not saying it is facts. Just trowing out ideas.

bpatters
And got the T-shirt

Post   » Thu Feb 20, 2020 5:50 pm


Why do you think she's overweight? Most weight recommendations that you find on line for guinea pigs are based on lab animals, not pets. Every sow I had hovered right at or over three pounds, and none were overweight.

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TheFerg

Post   » Thu Feb 20, 2020 6:17 pm


Our vet always checks our girls, and they are 1050g up to 1300 grams, and he clears all of them every time we are in as healthy - well muscled (large cage, lots of running up & down the ramp between levels, and some "toys" we made them for floor time that require climbing or moving objects to find their treats). And, most importantly, you can see under them when they walk or run around the cage. So they are very heavy by the chart standards, but very healthy and not overweight. Well, except Alleria who was recently told to drop a few grams haha. So now she guards the pellet bowl jealously and tries to eat them all before everyone else can. She is slowly losing a few grams each week though and is looking much better, and the other 3 are maintaining their weight just fine. But we do go through a lot more hay now that we don't have free range pellets and have started limiting them.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Feb 20, 2020 7:16 pm


Well muscled is great! I think exercise makes a big difference for guinea pigs and us too!

Some good guidelines on weight on this page:
http://www.guinealynx.info/weigh.html

sozansound2

Post   » Thu Feb 20, 2020 8:01 pm


Well, more specifically, when she would try to clean herself back then she would not be able to reach because of her belly so I knew she came up in weight to a point she struggled to clean herself. She was much heavier than my late male piggy as well.

So I kind of want her to be somewere were I see her to be much comfortable.

I feel that the weight she is in now looks good on her. This has been a 4-5 month difference of were she used to be.

I would like to give her the pellets like usual but now what stops me is the peeing in calcium from time to time.

sozansound2

Post   » Sun Mar 22, 2020 3:48 pm


Update:

So I decided to use the hay bin fleece to try and see about how much calcium she accumulates between 1-2 weeks. I picked up only dirty top layers of hay to keep it as neat as possible but leave the ones at the bottom so when she needs to use the bathroom, it will all be at the bottom.

Good thing is she loves to pick a corner after cage cleanup and always goes back to that same spot. Luckily she picked a corner in the hay bin fleece.

Decided to do this to give an idea. Me being the pig dad that I am, ofcourse I don't like seeing that lmao so wanted to do this to receive opinions.

In the image it is mostly, if not all, on the piece of hay/poop stuck together. There isint any at the bottom. They just latched on that piece as she picked that same spot every time.


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Renonvsparky

Post   » Tue Mar 24, 2020 10:23 pm


Have any of you tried growing your own guinea pig veggies and if so how did it turn out? The reason why I ask is because I'm trying it out. I don't have any delusions of being able to grow enough to feed all 4 of my boys, but I think I can get enough for treats and some of their needs. I've potted all colors of bell pepper as well as green leaf and butterhead lettuce as well as cucumber. The green leaf has sprouted pretty well already and I'll be growing them in pots. Cucumber is up too. Still waiting for the rest to sprout.

The weather has been off and on, but the sprouts are able to go outside off and on. In the next 2-3 weeks, they will be able to go outside for good. The reason I'm using pots is because the cats that roam our neighborhood have turned my garden space into a giant litter box. As much as I've clean it out, I wouldn't trust anything grown in it to be edible unless I remove the soil and replace it. Of course that would be the same as changing the litter for them. It's costly and a lot of work for nothing. I have a ton of the giant sunflowers to put in there and they grow very well around here.

I'm interested to see how others who have tried this have fared with it.

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ItsaZoo
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Tue Mar 24, 2020 10:49 pm


I had a very successful crop of leaf lettuce last year. Our yard has a little too much shade for vegetables and herbs, except a small area on the south side and that tends to bake in the summer sun.

I used a large window box and planted two rows of leaf lettuce. One was a row of mixed varieties and one was black seeded simpson. It grew fast and I had lettuce well into the fall. It was enough for a handful of baby leaves each day.

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