Food

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Renonvsparky

Post   » Wed Mar 25, 2020 1:51 am


The butterhead lettuce hasn't sprouted yet but the greenleaf went crazy so I've already put it in those long window boxes. There's 3 in each box. Only one green bell pepper has sprouted so far. I'm going to build a giant planter for the cucumbers and put it out front where I can control the cats getting into it. I'm going to the dollar store to get the pots I need for the bell peppers. I'm even more hopeful after hearing about your success. Thank you!

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed Mar 25, 2020 9:41 pm


I would make sure you put the peppers out when it is warm enough. They don't take off until the temperatures warm. I have never had luck with them but I think the newer varieties grow better.

Good luck growing the food!

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ItsaZoo
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Thu Mar 26, 2020 12:31 am


Lynx is right. I’ve had luck with bell peppers in the past, but they shut down if temps drop below 55. It usually happens just when they’re blossoming and then they drop the blossoms. The soil temp has to be above 65 degrees when you plant them outside. And epsom salt is a good fertilizer to increase production and improve flavor.

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Renonvsparky

Post   » Thu Mar 26, 2020 8:21 pm


Good advice. I'll be sure to do that. The soil and temperature around here is usually right for veggies to go outside around the middle of April. Indoor sprouting is best done in March. I should be just about on track with where I'm at now with the sprouts.

sozansound2

Post   » Fri Apr 03, 2020 3:17 am


So is calcium deposits in urine normal for pigs?

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Fri Apr 03, 2020 7:51 am


Guinea pigs normally pass calcium compounds in their urine. What you will normally see is intermittent cloudy urine and sometimes deposits that are not large but are fine and powdery when dry (noticeable if you are using fleece). Sometimes the deposits are excessive or gritty in which case adjusting diet seems to be the only way to manage them. Guinea pigs with excess calcium deposits can be more prone to stones and can suffer from interstitial cystitis. Read more:
Stones
What's Normal
Interstitial Cystitis Links

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Fri Apr 03, 2020 11:26 pm


Is she still on KMS Hayloft pellets?

sozansound2

Post   » Sat Apr 04, 2020 10:53 pm


Yes she is on kms pellets. I give her every other day. 1/2 a teaspoon. The picture I posted a few post back was about a 1-2 week accumulation in her hay tray were she mostly pees on.

Sometimes I see small patches of white since i have fleece outside of the tray but not normally. It mostly is in the bottom of the tray. Maybe 1 to 2 patches per week or so. A rough estimate.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Sun Apr 05, 2020 8:37 am


If it's just powdery and not gritty with larger particles, I probably wouldn't worry too much about it.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Sun Apr 05, 2020 8:50 am


Looking back at that photo you posted...do you always just keep their hay in one place, or was that just an experiment to try to gauge the amount of calcium deposits? Lack of exercise can supposedly cause the calcium to become more concentrated as the sediment just "sits" in the bladder where it becomes thicker and more sludge-like. I would encourage more activity by placing hay in various places in her cage, and at different heights. Same with water bottles, to encourage her to drink more and help keep the bladder flushed.

Just my $0.02.

sozansound2

Post   » Mon Apr 06, 2020 1:05 am


That tray isn't were she eats her hay from. It is clipped on the inside of the cage. I placed a tray under it to collect the leftover hay that falls, poop and pee since she spend her time there allot. I didn't spot clean it to collect and see how it looks like after a bit.

What is the difference in feeling from a gritty vs powdery?

Like sugar vs flour respectively?

I know for a fact it isn't sludge.

Also, she isn't the type of pig to run around allot even when her mate was with us. The mate was the one who would chase after her making her exercise even doe she didn't want too. I wouldn't think using my hand or object and chase her around would be a good idea to force movement to mimic that xD

She does run around the cage but rarely.

Floor time is just a sitting in a corner simulator for her. I place things in different spots. Never together. After the first few minutes, she would walk around. But 90% of the time is her in a corner lounging.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Mon Apr 06, 2020 9:23 pm


Sludge could be a large, pasty amount.

sozansound2

Post   » Mon Apr 06, 2020 11:18 pm


It isn't a paste like substance. Looks like cooking flour.

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Renonvsparky

Post   » Sat Apr 25, 2020 9:01 pm


Image

What kind of weed is this and can guinea pigs eat it? I have this weed growing all over my yard. I haven't been putting the piggies in the places where this grows because I don't know if it's safe for them to eat.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Sat Apr 25, 2020 9:14 pm


That looks like a geranium leaf to me.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sat Apr 25, 2020 10:02 pm


It does look like a geranium.

I took a pic with my android camera and did a google lens thing to identify it and the most likely plant seems to be Malva pusilla, the low mallow.

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Malva+pusilla+&atb=v202-1&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images

pfaf.org says there are no reports of toxicity but there can be high levels of nitrates when grown inorganically in some species. "The leaves are perfectly wholesome at all other times." Perhaps you can do some poking around the internet to see if you feel it is safe.

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Renonvsparky

Post   » Sun Apr 26, 2020 12:56 am


The ones in my yard are pretty hearty and their roots go deeper than a foot on the larger ones. The piggies have been doing fine with not eating it, so nothing lost if they don't eat it. I just won't worry so much if they do happen to get some.

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