Need advice: Adopt another pig for my older boar?

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LittleSqueakers

Post   » Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:47 pm


My 6-yr-old boar, Tribble, is recovering from mild GI stasis and seems to be doing very well. As he recovers, I can't help but speculate on the reason he might have gotten sick in the first place. After a lot of thought and observation, I really think that the big, underlying reason is that he wasn't eating enough hay throughout the day. And I think he wasn't eating enough hay because he's alone throughout the day and has nothing to stimulate him to get up several times a day to go eat.

Tribble lost his cagemate in mid-January, and at first, he seemed to relish in the expanded cage space. He was actually highly active following Flower's death because I switched everything around in his routine. He's always seemed to do great on his own as long as he has attention from me. But after school started again, I've been gone all day, 5 days a week, and I'm typically busy with homework during the evenings and on weekends. I live alone, and there's no one nearby who could come visit him during the day.

I know he must get horribly lonely, but I'm hesitant to adopt another pig for two major reasons: 1.) he is 6, and I have to wonder if the benefits of a new cagemate at this point would outweigh the stress on him. (However, he is a very laid-back guinea pig and has had several cagemates before at various times.) 2.) I'm limited financially, but I do have a few hundred dollars in a vet fund put away. But I'm even more limited in terms of time. I'm concerned about what I would be able to do if any of my pets should get sick at any point. The only reason I was able to give Tribble extra care and attention during his illness is because I was on spring break last week.

I'm torn and have a lot of conflicting ideas rolling around in my head about what would be best to do here. It breaks my heart to think that Tribble is lonely, but I also don't want to get another pet that I may not be able to give the best medical care should the pet need it.

I could really use some input and some different perspectives on this situation. I've posted this question here and on the guineapigcages forum in hopes of getting as much input as possible. What would you do? Any advice would be GREATLY appreciated!

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Tue Mar 13, 2018 11:33 pm


It sounds like you feel a companion would really make a difference. This page may help for the time being:
www.guinealynx.info/alone.html

LittleSqueakers

Post   » Wed Mar 14, 2018 7:35 pm


To be honest, I think I would really like to get a second pig, even if (with Tribble's advanced age) I'm back down to one again before long and have to get the second one a new friend. But the decision sort of hinges on whether or not I want to continuing keeping pigs long-term and whether or not I can. I know that I would absolutely want to continue keeping pigs. The question of whether or not I can is much more difficult to answer... Honestly, I don't like the idea of people getting pets without regard to the animal's needs. I've been a vet tech for a lot of years, and I've seen the consequences of poor decision-making too many times to count. But I'm not ignorant; I have a good idea of what I'm getting myself into when I adopt a GP.

I'm just thinking of if a pig gets sick and needs regular feedings like Tribble did this past week, or if a pig needs surgery for a bladder stone or something; those are the things I just simply can't handle right now. My situation isn't ideal, but I know that I could provide a pig in need with a loving, safe home, a clean environment, and enough attention to keep a bonded pair happy. I can't do everything, but I'll always do everything I can. The question is, is that enough???

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed Mar 14, 2018 8:48 pm


You have the advantage of experience and the ability to recognize if there is an issue. If you work, could you bring a sick guinea pig with you for feeding?

You should be able to make informed decisions about their care with your knowledge.

Many pigs live long, relatively healthy lives. But there certainly are no guarantees.

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