New Book: "Super Poopers"

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Sef
I dissent.

Post   » Sat Oct 17, 2020 10:14 pm


Not sure if this would be worth the $9.99 to see if this has anything interesting or concerning:

Super Poopers - Species appropriate nutrition for guinea pigs

(The book is self-published and the author doesn't appear to have any scientific or veterinary background.)

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ItsaZoo
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Sat Oct 17, 2020 11:50 pm


It looks interesting. It would be worth requesting at the library on an inter-library loan.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sun Oct 18, 2020 11:00 pm


It would be interesting to see what she has to say. I know what I would be looking for and how I would evaluate the book. There is a "look inside" to get a glimpse.

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Sef
I dissent.

Post   » Mon Oct 19, 2020 7:27 pm


I downloaded it onto my Kindle reader. Not a big fan of this booklet, particularly for US owners. Among other things:
  • Heavily advocates going out and picking all kinds of herbs and flowers. I can see this being dangerous for anyone who can't identify plants (or doesn't have access to uncontaminated grasses and plants);
  • Has many gassy veggies on her "safe" list, including kohl, broccoli, cauliflower, certain types of cabbage;
  • Advocates sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, banana, grapes and a few other dubious things as "treats";
  • States that butterhead (I assume bibb lettuce?) has too many nitrates---I have not been able to confirm this;
  • Doesn't advocate the use of pellets;
  • States that it's unnatural to use a water bottle, and advocates using a bowl instead.
On the plus side, she makes recommendations on various types of leaves and branches to chew on, and has a "safe" and "unsafe" list of various plants, trees, etc. She also emphasizes the need to introduce new foods very slowly. Her list of suggested vegetables is pretty much in keeping with what we would suggest (lettuces, peppers, carrot, tomato, cucumber, etc.)

Overall, the author tries to make a lot of points about how and what guinea pigs eat and behave "in the wild." Some of it may be quite valid, but I just don't think some of her recommendations are very practical for most owners.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Mon Oct 19, 2020 9:31 pm


When you get down to what animals eat in the wild, there is no way what we are feeding matches that at all.

I don't understand the eating leaves and branches. Grasses yes. Guinea pigs are right there on the ground, checking out the grass. Probably not foraging for their dinner in the trees ;-)

Bookfan
For the Love of Pigs

Post   » Tue Oct 20, 2020 12:17 pm


Seems to me our pet guinea pigs are pretty far removed from pigs that live in the wild. I assume that would include some difference in dietary needs.

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ItsaZoo
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Wed Oct 21, 2020 2:05 am


I don't buy in to the comparisons of domestic animals feeding habits and their wild relatives.

The example I always see is the comparison between dogs and wolves. There's a whole marketing industry pushing food for dogs that "get back to their wild nature." The foods are primarily grain-free, high in protein and low in carbs since wolves eat primarily meat. The truth is, domestic dogs evolved as companions to humans and their digestive systems evolved to match the types of food people ate. Carbs and grains became part of the domestic dog's diet, and their gut bacteria changed to become similar to ours. So unless they have a food sensitivity, carbs and grains are part of a healthy diet. Wolves on the other hand can't digest carbs well at all.

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