Fasting for 12 hours before surgery?

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Mon Jan 06, 2020 10:38 am


Although you won't necessarily get an immediate response, if the handful of members who monitor the medical board are online and think they can help, they will try to offer advice.

Guinea Lynx has been around over 20 years. Back before social media took over, members used the general chat forum as their "yahoo answers" for advice on almost anything under the sun.

MarlowePieper11

Post   » Tue Jan 07, 2020 5:28 pm


As it turns out the Vet we had scheduled for Thursday called today and said due to the rest nature of small animal surgery she would recommend holding off for a few months, them taking another x-ray to see if it got bigger. I explained my concerns about putting it off until it was an emergency state, because every time I have an emergency with one of my guinea pigs it seems to happen in the middle of the night when no one is available to help, and that's not the situation I want to find myself in because of this bladder stone. I asked her what she would do if that's where her guinea pig and she said she would hold off to see what happens. I asked her what the outcomes have mostly been for these types of surgery is when she's done them in the past. Although two of the front desk girls had previously told me that she had done these surgeries before and she had been working with guinea pigs for 27 years and only lost one, the doctor today informed me that in fact she had never performed a cystotomy on a guinea pig. She has spayed and neutered guinea pigs, and done a cystotomy on a rabbit, but this would be her first of this kind. That was very frustrating because I was under a a different impression. had I known this was her first time doing the surgery I would not have booked her. Needless to say this is the second surgery I've canceled. I have an appointment for a check-up at a third location on Friday. this surgeon wasn't able to get him in until the 14th which is why I didn't choose them. Money was also an issue as the appointment he had on Thursday was going to be between $800- $1,000. This place I'm taking him for a check-up at on Friday quoted me between $1200-$1,800. The only upside to that has this doctor performed three cystotomies on guinea pigs just last week. Is that about the price range you all have looked at? I'm in Connecticut.

bpatters
And got the T-shirt

Post   » Tue Jan 07, 2020 5:37 pm


I paid $400 for one, $650 for another.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Tue Jan 07, 2020 7:58 pm


Wow. Wasn't expecting that. Does the $1,200-1,800 for the surgery include any meds, fluids, antibiotics? Or just the procedure? If the second vet had said, "I haven't done a cystotomy on a guinea pig, but I feel very confident that I can do it successfully," that would be one thing. My own vet had never done this procedure before, the first time we had a bladder stone, but she had done several successful other surgeries on rabbits and guinea pigs (including neuters) and was quite confident. This vet sounds reluctant. It's rare for a male guinea pig to pass a stone, although it *can* happen. I've had it happen with at least one of ours. More than likely, though, it will get bigger and more painful as time goes on. 5mm is a fairly decent-size stone. And, as already mentioned, there is also a possibility of it becoming lodged in the urethra. I'd be curious to see the x-rays to get an idea of where the stone is.

How is he doing as far as pain when eliminating? You mentioned earlier that he was crying. Is he still doing that? Passing any blood? Does he seem to hunch or strain while peeing or pooping? Was he put on any antibiotics or pain meds?

MarlowePieper11

Post   » Wed Jan 08, 2020 8:25 am


So the maddening thing is that he's not actually making much noise when he's eliminating now! It was at its very worst when we came home from his first vet appointment after they had done his X-rays oh, but they did mention they'd manipulated his body around a lot to get those pictures so maybe he was not feeling well in general. That was last Friday. this is weird but he actually peed on me while he was in a deep sleep and I didn't mind it at all because, 1- I was glad he was still urinating and able to, 2- even though he did it in his sleep, it didn't wake him up or cause him any pain. I am glad just to go on Friday to this second doctor to get another opinion on what to do. Best case scenario would be that he passes this Stone but 5 mm to me seems impossible. The pricing is for everything, not just the procedure. It's for the fluids, and they keep him overnight.
Just taking a look at the estimate again it includes all the injections, presumably x-rays that they'll do after the operation, anesthesia, the catheter, all fluids.
"Aerobic culture and Mic with staph" is $192-no idea what that is.
Also, the bladder stone analysis is $110-do I need to do that?

MarlowePieper11

Post   » Wed Jan 08, 2020 8:53 am


Nevermind I take back what I just said oh, I put him back in his cage after snuggles this morning and he was squeaking while he was defecating. My poor little guy.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed Jan 08, 2020 9:39 am


Watch for incontinence, too.
http://www.guinealynx.info/urine_scald.html

Has any vet provided you with pain killers, like meloxicam?

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Wed Jan 08, 2020 9:44 am


I'd skip the analysis. Most (not all, but the majority) of stones in guinea pigs are comprised of calcium carbonate.

MarlowePieper11

Post   » Thu Jan 09, 2020 7:45 am


No, no pain killers, but I don't actually think he needs them. The pain is minimal now and he is absolutely normal after urinating. He's zooming around his cage as I write this.

MarlowePieper11

Post   » Sun Jan 12, 2020 9:23 pm


Finley has his surgery scheduled for this Tuesday. I emailed then asking for an x-ray before they take him into surgery to be certain he didn't pass this stone-improbable as it may be. He has NO symptoms right now to speak of. The surgery is so scary 😬. Anyways we take him in Tuesday. She also told me I need to change his diet, she said I give him too many veggies so to cut back on that. I also let him graze clover in the yard in summer so I'll stop that-I had no idea that was bad for him. After the surgery he'll be on painkillers and antibiotics.

She also mentioned 2 medications to put him on, seemingly, for the rest of his life? One is to change the pH of his urine, she said it will change it very slightly but may help to prevent future stones. I can remember the other! I'm a bit way to put him on those as he is so young. Especially given that I can change his diet pretty easily.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:23 pm


I take it you have read http://www.guinealynx.info/stones.html ? It has some valuable information. Sef posted it earlier.

MarlowePieper11

Post   » Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:31 pm


I have thanks

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Mon Jan 13, 2020 7:09 am


She also told me I need to change his diet, she said I give him too many veggies so to cut back on that.
Grumble. I'd say it's generally wise to cut back on higher calcium vegetables, but I wouldn't necessarily say that cutting back on all veggies will do anything either way. If anything, the moisture in lettuces (avoid romaine) and other "watery" veggies can help keep the bladder flushed.

I think an x-ray is always a good idea before bladder removal surgery, just so the vet can 1) verify that the stone is still there; and 2) locate the stone and see if more may have formed since the last set of images.

Good luck tomorrow -- keep us posted.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Mon Jan 13, 2020 8:28 am


Ditto Sef on all counts. Consider also fresh clean grass, introduced slowly. I don't think grass has much vitamin C in it (don't know why) so some fresh vegs would still be a good source of it.

MarlowePieper11

Post   » Mon Jan 13, 2020 12:03 pm


I was giving him 1/4 slice of green, orange and red bell peppers 2x a day, she said to cut back to 1 salad sized slice of 1 of those colors once a day. I need to but more least greens for him, and she also recommended herbs, like mint, basil and dill which I'll buy and test out. He is not an overweight pig at all. I'd say he's not even a normal male size. He's just a little guy! And he wouldn't always finish all three peppers but he did a pretty good job and getting through them. I was giving him a full carrot maybe every other day or so but I've cut back to a tiny slice of carrot every couple of days. she was pretty angry that first day when I cut back on his veggies but he has gotten used to it even just a couple days into and has been eating more hay which is good. I also unknowingly used to we have unlimited amounts of hay and pellets out, but now have cut back to 1/8 of a cup of pellets a day. Hoping all these changes will be helpful.

The vet emailed me back today saying that it's normal procedure for them to x-ray him before the surgery. She said that last week, in fact, it turns out that one pig had passed the stoned and didn't need the surgery. I'm really hoping that's the case for us! But tomorrow we'll know.

bpatters
And got the T-shirt

Post   » Mon Jan 13, 2020 2:33 pm


Almost all herbs are high in calcium.

MarlowePieper11

Post   » Mon Jan 13, 2020 2:41 pm


Oh boy. I'd looks at 1 website thought listed many different types of herbs and if they were high, low or moderate in calcium levels. After your latest comment I looked at another website which said practically all of those herbs were full of calcium. I think I'll just stay with red and green lettuce and my peppers

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Mon Jan 13, 2020 5:53 pm


You might check this out, if you haven't already:
http://www.guinealynx.info/diet.html
http://www.guinealynx.info/chart.html

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Mon Jan 13, 2020 8:18 pm


Leafy greens but not romaine should be fine.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 6:44 am


For what it's worth, this is the "low calcium" plan I came up with a few years ago when we were having a series of bladder stones and bladder issues:

Image

I no longer feed romaine or iceberg. The iceberg was added because of the high water content in an effort to help prevent sludge, but it has zero nutritional value. I also no longer feed any fruit.

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