Olive's gas problem

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ItsaZoo
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Mon Mar 16, 2020 1:19 am


Some fresh veggies are more gassy than others, like cucumbers and green peppers. Does she get all her veggies at one time, or just a few here and there throughout the day? I cut veggies and put them in a treat ball that my Guinean pig has to roll around. Then she eats slower and is walking which helps digestion.

Olive

Post   » Mon Mar 16, 2020 2:30 am


Throughout the day. And she has enough floor time and is active in the cage as well when she isn't on the floor.

No bad signs as such. I'm mainly concerned about the fall in droppings. She is also eating most of her fecal droppings. Can there any particular reason for doing that?

Olive

Post   » Mon Mar 16, 2020 9:22 pm


Just circling around for my unanswered questions.

1. Can a lower water intake cause the droppings to be tear shaped?
2. Reasons why she might be eating most of her droppings (cecal as well as fecal)?

Also, should I put her off her veggies if she is showing signs of gas?

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Mon Mar 16, 2020 9:50 pm


Lower water intake can make them dry. Tear-shaped, to me, speaks more to an imbalance of gut flora and/or GI upset. So does increased cecal consumption. Have you tried a probiotic?

ETA: I see where she was on a probiotic at one time. Did it seem to help?

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ItsaZoo
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Mon Mar 16, 2020 10:08 pm


Sounds like the symptoms mine had when she was getting over the Baytril nastiness. Gut flora and digestion were wonky, things weren’t moving and she was eating droppings of both kinds. I was using Probios paste from the vet but it took about a week to get back to normal.

bpatters
And got the T-shirt

Post   » Mon Mar 16, 2020 10:29 pm


I don't think shaped droppings are caused by lower water intake. Dry poops are generally crumbly. Poops with a tail on them indicate a gut disturbance, possibly bloat.

She's eating the fecal poops because she senses something isn't quite right. It's self medication.

And yes, especially cut back on any gas-producing veggies if she has signs of gas.

Olive

Post   » Mon Mar 16, 2020 10:52 pm


She was on probiotics for some time. I'm not entirely sure if it helped or not, because at that point she was really unwell and her droppings had dropped to almost zero. She was healthy within a week of that though.

What is the correct dosage for probiotics? And I give her tomatoes, cucumber and carrots. None of them are gas-producing, are they?

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Mon Mar 16, 2020 11:06 pm


Cucumbers could be. Actually, for any guinea pig with a sensitive gut, there can be trigger foods that might not be what you'd ordinarily think of as "gassy." We have a senior male who can only eat very small amounts of veggies at a time. After trial and error, I have found that the only veggies he can have (again, in very small amounts) are carrot, zucchini, Boston lettuce (tiny bit), green bean and red/orange/yellow bell peppers. If it's more than just a very small amount, he will have a painful gas/bloat episode. He's a low daily dose of Metoclopramide in an effort to keep his gut moving properly, and it seems to help somewhat.

How much of those veggies do you feed daily? Does she get unlimited hay?

Olive

Post   » Mon Mar 16, 2020 11:29 pm


She does get unlimited hay. I mix cucumbers, tomatoes and carrots into a salad and provide it in small quantities throughout the day. I'll get her off cucumber for now.

Please advise on the appropriate dosage of probiotic?

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Tue Mar 17, 2020 12:12 am


Probiotic use really isn't an exact science. I generally just buy plain acidophilus, open the capsule and sprinkle roughly half on a wet piece of lettuce. Or you can mix it with a little Critical Care. Might be worth a try.

Olive

Post   » Tue Mar 17, 2020 12:30 am


Okay. And can probiotics be mixed with water?

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Tue Mar 17, 2020 5:46 am


Can be, yes.

Olive

Post   » Tue Mar 17, 2020 12:20 pm


Thank you for all your help. I've started with the probiotics along with the other medicines. Will keep posting about her progress.

Olive

Post   » Wed Mar 18, 2020 2:09 pm


Update: She has been on probios for a day and a half now. Her poop count seemed to have gone up. But that was till today evening. She seems to be pooping lesser now and I also noticed mucus in her poop.

It says on the forum, "Mucus in stool can point to an infection or bacteria in the intestinal track" (Link: http://www.guinealynx.info/forums/viewtopic.php?t=68360). So, does this apply to just the bad bacteria or the good ones as well? I was thinking if she has taken more probiotics than required and this is her system passing the extra stuff out?

Olive

Post   » Wed Mar 18, 2020 8:00 pm


I also heard her squeaking when she was peeing. There was calcium in her urine as well. The urine levels seem to be a little lower than usual as well. All these seem to be pointing towards bladder stones?

It says on some of the forums that one can try removing the stones by increasing the water intake. Increased water intake will sometimes push the stones out of the body. Does it work?

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Wed Mar 18, 2020 8:25 pm


Increased fluids can help flush small stones and grit, particularly with females, but not always. It depends on the size and location of the stone(s). You might find this helpful:
http://www.guinealynx.info/stones.html

X-rays are the best way to rule out (or confirm) bladder stones.

Olive

Post   » Thu Mar 19, 2020 1:31 am


About the mucus; Does it apply to good bacteria as well?

Olive

Post   » Thu Mar 19, 2020 8:04 am


Update: I'm going to have her urine and stool tested tomorrow for a bacterial infection as well as get an x-ray done for bladder stones.

Quick question. What's the difference between trimethoprim and enrofloxacin? Can the two be used interchangeably?

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Thu Mar 19, 2020 9:42 am


No, they are two different drugs. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SMZ) is a combination of two antibiotics - one is a sulfa drug, and I'm not sure the class of drug of trimethoprim falls into - marketed as Bactrim. Enrofloxacin is different class of antibiotic (fluoroquinolone), marketed as Baytril. For bladder-related infections, SMZ/Bactrim is generally the drug of choice. It tends to be better tolerated than Baytril.

On the mucous...I would think it is more likely that there is a gut imbalance causing the mucous -- not that you're seeing "bacteria" (good or bad) being eliminated in the stools.

Olive

Post   » Thu Mar 19, 2020 10:01 am


So, what you're essentially saying is that trimethoprim is used for urinary infections and enrofloxacin is used for bacterial infections? And what do you mean when you say Bactrim is better tolerated than Baytril?

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