Olive's gas problem

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Olive

Post   » Fri Mar 20, 2020 3:04 pm


I do not have any other pets in the house. Will just continue with the increased metoclopramide dosage for now then, till we have something concrete for internal parasites.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Fri Mar 20, 2020 7:53 pm


I would still have a conversation with your veterinarian about the stool sample results. If this is indeed hookworm, hookworm is not a parasite specific to guinea pigs -- it's fairly common in dogs and cats. You can at least ask for verification; hookworms are easy to detect and have a very distinctive appearance. The vet can give you an idea of how heavily infested the sample was, and can talk with you about treatment. There are a lot of different cavy-safe oral anti-parasitics such as Ivermectin, Albon, Metronidazole, etc. From what I've been reading, though, Panacur (Fenbendazole) does seem to be the most common drug to use for hookworm in most animals. In guinea pigs, the dosage appears to be 20mg/kg every 24 hours for 5 days. You can also try doing a search on these forums for Panacur.

I tend to associate internal parasites with diarrhea, but I haven't been able to find any information on how hookworm presents in guinea pigs. In humans, the symptoms are listed as abdominal pain, diarrhea, loss of appetite, weight loss, fatigue and anemia.

I'm sorry that I can't be of more help.

Olive

Post   » Fri Mar 20, 2020 10:16 pm


The urine sample should also have traces of the parasite, isn't it? The urine report will be a more detailed one which will give information about the bacteria and/ or parasite found along with the appropriate antibiotic for it. If the problem in hand is not REALLY URGENT, I think I should wait till I have the urine report before I talk to a vet?

bpatters
And got the T-shirt

Post   » Fri Mar 20, 2020 11:45 pm


No. Parasites are not usually found in urine, but in the digestive tract. That report was from a stool sample.

Olive

Post   » Sat Mar 21, 2020 1:10 am


I did a bit of digging in my own and it seems that a 20mg dose of fenbendazole for 5 days should do the trick, followed by a similar process after 14 days to prevent regrowth. Most of the clinics here are shut in fear of the fast spreading COVID-19. I'll try reaching out to vets on LinkedIn and see if I can get any help. If not, I'm afraid I'll have to take it in my own hands.

Olive

Post   » Sat Mar 21, 2020 5:49 am


I just noticed that the left side of her body just before where her leg begins in swollen. It is also visible on the x-ray (most clearly visible on the 3rd picture that Lynx uploaded. Is this a reaction caused by possible bacteria/ parasite? I also noticed that she has lost a lot of fur around that area.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Sat Mar 21, 2020 8:33 am


It could very well be her body's autoimmune response to the parasites. Also, internal parasites deplete nutrients from the body, which is why anemia is common. You might try increasing her vitamin C intake, as swollen joints and hair loss could be indicative of vitamin C deficiency.

Olive

Post   » Sat Mar 21, 2020 9:10 am


Is there a link available on the forum for Vitamin C? Also, if I use supplements, what is the appropriate dose?

Update: The country is in a lockdown drill tomorrow to prepare for the virus. It might well stretch till Monday. So, I'm starting the treatment using a 20mg per day dose of fenbendazole. There's also a visible fall in her appetite now. I do not think I should wait till Tuesday.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Sat Mar 21, 2020 10:04 am



Olive

Post   » Sat Mar 21, 2020 10:23 am


Thank you so much. I'm also finding it difficult to massage her as she's in a lot of pain because of her swelling. She keeps squeaking as soon as I start massaging her. Is it advisable to wait out the massaging for some time?

Also, she's already getting an increased dose of metoclopramide along with a standard dose of simethicone and meloxicam. Is it safe to administer fenbendazole along with these drugs? If so, how much should be the gap? If not, which ones should I forego at the moment?

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Sat Mar 21, 2020 11:46 am


I would probably forego massage for now if it's too painful for her. If you have a vibrating pillow or vibrating toothbrush, those can be a good alternative.

According to Plumb's Veterinary Drug Handbook (6th edition), there are no known drug interactions with Fenbendazole. I would say that you can use it concurrently with Metacam and Simethicone.

Do keep in mind that none of us here is a veterinarian, and very few of us (if any) have actually dealt with internal/intestinal parasites. It's just not that common in the US. My best advice would be for you to continue to research this online and see if there are any resources or veterinarians elsewhere who might be willing to consult with you over the phone.

Olive

Post   » Sat Mar 21, 2020 11:50 am


I thoroughly understand that your advice comes from your experience and not from medical expertise. I have also simultaneously been backing up everything that is advised here with my own research. Thank you so much for all the help. Will keep updating. To be on the safe side I'll keep some time-gap between the doses.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Sat Mar 21, 2020 12:00 pm


Sounds good. Do keep us posted. Wishing you both well.

Olive

Post   » Sat Mar 21, 2020 9:27 pm


Just confirming once; The dosage mentioned for fenbendazole on Guinea Lynx is 50mg/ kg (Link: https://www.guinealynx.info/antiparasitics.html). Is this dosage applicable for giardia and not roundworms?

Also, according to ESCCAP's (European Scientific Counsel Companion Animal Parasites) Control of Parasites and Fungal Infections In Small Pet Animals Guidelines (1st edition), "Fenbendazole (20–50 mg/kg bodyweight orally) may also be used and is generally administered in a week on/week off rotation for at least 3 cycles". So does the dosage vary from 20-50 mg depending on the severity?

Again, I understand that none of you are vets. But, in the absence of one (they're asking for a check-up once the clinic is open), I have to rely on you guys and the internet.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Sat Mar 21, 2020 10:35 pm


According to James Carpenter's Exotic Animal Formulary (5th edition), the dosage is 20mg/kg for guinea pigs, given orally for 5 days. It doesn't say anything about week on/week off. An additional notation lists a dosage range of 20-50 mg/kg for "all species" (of rodent), but with the caveat: "For giardiasis; a lower dose is generally preferred; higher dose for giardiasis only."

I would say try it for 5 days at 20 mg/kg and then see if there is any improvement.

Olive

Post   » Sun Mar 22, 2020 12:30 am


Thank you. Today is the 2nd day of the fenbendazole. Let's hope for the best.

Olive

Post   » Sun Mar 22, 2020 12:35 am


*You said, "For giardiasis; a lower dose is generally preferred; higher dose for giardiasis only.". Did you mean, "For *round/hookworms (or something along those lines); a lower dose is generally preferred; higher dose for giardiasis only."

Olive

Post   » Mon Mar 23, 2020 6:13 am


Update: Her urine report just came back. The report was normal (Link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1ki_1Tb8weH1nJmGel48nsmta62eMRqvn). So, looks like we are dealing with just the gas and intestinal parasites.

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:37 am


It's good to at least rule out a UTI.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:50 am


Did you mean, "For *round/hookworms...
No, I was just making the point that the higher dosages seemed to be suggested only for giardiasis and not hookworms.

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