Fasting for 12 hours before surgery?

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:58 am


I like reading your comments. Kind of puts in perspective how useful a food is (if not liked, not very useful!).

If you have a scale that is accurate in small amounts, for those items you frequently give, it would be nice to know how many grams your guinea pigs get.

MarlowePieper11

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 12:13 am


Y'all!!! Finn had his surgery scheduled for today, so my husband and I dropped him at the vet this morning. I won't go into all the emotions that doing that brought on. Anyways, they said they had to cystotomy is to do including his and the very latest we would hear anything from them would be 5 p.m. as they don't do the surgery straight away. I got to work at 10 a.m. and by 11 my husband, who had the day off, called me and said that they had sedated him and done an x-ray. They found that he had PASSED THE STONE!!! Our original vet, who is records we had transferred to the surgeon, had told us that the stone was 5 mm large. The surgeon's office today told us that that was inaccurate and she doesn't know how they came up on that measurement. Like I told you all earlier, my husband and I had a very strong feeling that he passed it since there is no more pain when he goes to the bathroom, but I'm doing research and talking to so many doctors we thought it was unreasonable to think that he could have passed it, but we are so grateful to have our piggy back to us tonight unscathed! Thank you to everyone for all of your help, insight, patience, and support. It truly means more than you know. I'm so happy to have this thread now to look back on if this issue comes up again, sincerely hoping it never comes up again!

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ItsaZoo
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 12:19 am


Sef, that’s a nice reference chart.

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ItsaZoo
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 12:26 am


So glad Finn passed that stone! Hopefully with a change in diet and some meds, you can prevent another stone from forming.

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daisymay
Supporter 2016-2019

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 3:21 am


So happy all went well and that the first vet was wrong! Give him a cuddle from us! A real clever boy!

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 6:21 am


Excellent! Absolutely excellent. I'd be curious to know what the actual size of the stone was, that he passed. It would be useful as a reference.

Stones do tend to recur, unfortunately, so this would be a good time to re-evaluate his diet in order to work towards prevention. What pellets have you been feeding and in what daily amount? KMS Hayloft is a very good brand with lower calcium than any other commercial pellet on the US market.

I posted a sample "diet" of lower calcium veggies that I have fed my guys in the hopes of preventing stones (sadly, I've dealt with 6 or 7 stone pigs over the years). There are many other factors besides what they eat, however, but mitigating the risk by lowering overall calcium in the diet can be a good start. Have you ever had your water supply tested for hardness?

Fingers crossed that he stays stone-free!

MarlowePieper11

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 7:19 am


Thanks so much for the chart! I switched to KMS pellets last week when I saw someone suggested then and I do ⅛ of a cup a day, he loves them. My husband picked him up and says they didn't say how large it was. Maybe I can get in touch with them and ask. Sef, did you put your pigs on meds to prevent stones? They suggested it but I'm wary about having him on them for years and would rather control diet.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:33 am


If you can find out the stone size, I think it would be useful. While it obviously does happen on occasion, a male guinea pig passing a stone (particularly a larger one) is not all that common.

I have not used a urine acidifer with any of ours. There is no clear evidence to support that the highly alkaline urine of a guinea pig can be made acidic enough to prevent calcium carbonate stones. Even if the urine can be made reliably, consistently acidic, you potentially run into the opposite issue of forming struvite or calcium oxalate stones which tend to form in a more acidic environment.

What other medication/supplement were they suggesting?

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 11:34 am


I wrote KMSHayloft with a couple requests over a week ago and got no reply at all.

I wondered if the pellet ingredient list on the bag is still 100% accurate. I'd like to do a comparison of a handful of the better pellets (our list is really old).

Oh, and I am SO HAPPY to hear he passed the stone! That is wonderful!

On the stones page, there is a reference to shillintong, which is supposed to relax things so stones can pass easier. Keep in mind that shillintong is NOT curative or in any way an alternative to a needed surgery.

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Catie Cavy
Supporter 2011-2020

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:29 pm


Yay! So glad Finn didn't need surgery.

I think water and exercise are both helpful with preventing stones. If he doesn't seem to drink a lot of water, you can wet down his lettuce. You can also syringe feed him extra water and give him fruits and veggies high in water content. Consider giving him floor time if you don't already.

MarlowePieper11

Post   » Wed Jan 15, 2020 11:14 pm


He does love running around our bedroom and how funny you mentioned the syringe feeding water bc I just say down in the couch after giving him 3 syringe fulls if water. He does drink on his own but happens to love syringes! Lucky me as he was a dream the one time he had to be in antibiotics. Ya I'm not going to put him on any meds, just do fewer pellets and lessen the peppers I give him daily I guess?

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Jan 16, 2020 7:59 am


How much pepper had you been giving him?

MarlowePieper11

Post   » Thu Jan 16, 2020 3:22 pm


3, 1/4 slices of green, red and orange peppers in the morning and in the evening. He is pretty bummed with the slice or 2 a day I give him now. And a tiny slice of carrot. He is small, but he can pack it away and he is active! Also, what is the red and green lettuce actually called? I think a spring mix has too many things that aren't great for him. And someone said no Romain.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Thu Jan 16, 2020 5:00 pm


Do check out the list I posted. He can get a good variety of veggies that are lower in calcium. Ours like all kinds of things: zucchini, Bibb lettuce, green leaf, carrot "matchsticks," small bits of red/orange/yellow bell peppers, cilantro, etc. I rotate the veggies for variety.

Also look at the Diet page. There is a link on there somewhere called "Favorites" that others have posted.

MarlowePieper11

Post   » Thu Jan 16, 2020 6:20 pm


Thank you!

On a side note, he chokes a lot. Neither of my other girls really ever did. He chokes on veggies, and on pellets. Not just here and there, but often. Today someone told me he chokes a few times, aka coughed hard to be specific, on a pellet, so she chopped them up for him. It's just something that he has been doing since he was little and I was wondering if anyone else has experienced this with their pig.

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Sef
Supporter in 2019

Post   » Thu Jan 16, 2020 6:35 pm


I have. We had a guinea pig with heart issues who sometimes did that.

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daisymay
Supporter 2016-2019

Post   » Thu Jan 16, 2020 9:18 pm


Here is Australia we call the red and green lettuces Oak, mixed and symphony lettuces. But in the USA I know they will be called something else.

Our girls some times cough. It is the cutest but scariest sound ever! So glad he is doing better!

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Lynx
RESIST

Post   » Thu Jan 16, 2020 10:05 pm


One of my guinea pigs would eat peppers too fast and cough.

I encourage you to get a scale and weigh one of your slices of pepper. You can get an idea of its nutrient value from the chart on this page (note that foods are different weights, in 10 calorie amounts). 10 calories of green pepper weigh 50gm. 10 calories of red, weigh 32 gm and yellow, weigh 37 gm. All are high in vitamin C.
http://www.guinealynx.info/chart.html

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